Arts & Entertainment

Photo Op: Remembering Chadwick Boseman

By: Stella DeMarco and Joe Clark

Actor Chadwick Boseman passed away Thursday, Aug. 28, at the age of 43 after a four-year battle with colon cancer. Boseman kept the diagnosis private and continued to work and make films while battling cancer. 

While best known for playing T’Challa in Black Panther, Boseman has also played James Brown in Get on Up and Jackie Robinson in 42. 

He also appeared as T’Challa in Captain America: Civil War, Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame. His other film credits include Da 5 Bloods, Draft Day, Marshall and 21 Bridges.

Black Panther director Ryan Coogler released a statement on Sunday. 

“Because he was a caretaker, a leader and a man of faith, dignity and pride, he shielded his collaborators from his suffering. He lived a beautiful life,” Coogler said    

 Boseman’s role as Black Panther, the first black superhero to come to the main screen, was especially important because it helped provide representation to Black people across the world.

His Black Panther co-star Danai Gurira was one of many who took to Instagram to pay tribute to Boseman, writing that Boseman was “A true class act. And so perfectly equipped to take on the responsibility of leading the franchise that changed everything for Black representation.” 

Here is what some Xavier students had to say about Bozeman, his death and his legacy.

Michael Williams 
Junior sports management major
“It’s tough. 2020 has been a year to forget, honestly. I am just praying for a better year. For me, it’s not so much his roles, but his social activism was very important.”
Emilie Ivy
First-year communication Studies major
“We will mourn him as we watch these movies that we love, but he left his mark by making it a part of his career to tell Black stories and cheer Black people on. He was authentically himself and a lot of us felt like we knew him. He will be missed.”
Mark Cuison
Senior nursing major 
“We will mourn him as we watch these movies that we love, but he left his mark by making it a part of his career to tell Black stories and cheer Black people on. He was authentically himself and a lot of us felt like we knew him. He will be missed.”
Maria Fulhorst
First-year political science major
“I definitely feel like he helped people of color, and they were able to look up to him, which you see in the media with Disney princesses and this was the first time we really saw that in superhero movies, especially live action ones.”
Sierra Tamalonis
Junior history and international studies major
“He was able to be such a national and international hero while he was fighting and nobody knew. I think he really became a role model for a lot of little kids for the future for them to look up to. I think that is a really amazing thing.” 
Kate Ortega 
First-year criminal justice major
“It was a huge shock because I wasn’t aware of the situation… He really put himself out there, and he broke down so many barriers in the film industry.”